Commentary: Gethsemane

I was in my room reading Matthew 26:36-46 and I was struck by the sheer humanness of Jesus. The lines –

38 “and he said to them, ‘The sorrow in my heart is so great that it almost crushes me. Stay here and keep watch with me.’

– hit me first and birthed the opening lines of my poem Gethsemane. We have all experienced extremely low and painful moments in our lives, what this passage reveals to us is that Jesus has been there too. In my weakest and most heartbroken, when the sorrow in my heart was so great it almost crushed me – God has felt this too. I am floored that this is a Love and this is a God who intimately knows my suffering and that through suffering I can grow deeper in my relationship with Christ.

The lines –

40 “Then he returned to the three disciples and found them asleep; and he said to Peter, ‘How is it that you three were not able to keep watch with me for even one hour?'”

– hit me next and I felt the disappointment Jesus must have felt in that moment when he found his disciples asleep. The experience of being disappointed by your friends and loved ones is profoundly universal and I wanted to capture that my poem as much as I could. People let us down and the weight of that disappointment can be enormously heavy but I have found in my experiences of disappointment God can meet you there and help you carry that weight (and even take it away).

Hands

I can tell you I love you

With just my hands

As my finger traces the silhouette

On your skin

As I lace my fingers through yours

So you are reminded, in that moment

Together

We face the world

 

My hands speak truer words than my lips

As they caress your face

I am certain there is a language

Through which my hands speak

 

And when we’re alone

Cocooned in sheets

Every touch is intensified

Electrified with every embrace

 

I grasp

Overwhelmed by the alchemy my hands make

Enchanted by

The sheer majesty the light

Our love creates